Convergent Boundaries: Landscapes without Memory, Memory without Land. (2014)


The contemporary lens brings a burden of question alongside with it in the digital age. Photographic truth - what is “real” and what is “authentic” (Robins, 2014) are ideas deeply rooted within this project. This series explores this, as I have created images that combine digitally created landscapes I made on cartographic software, with macro shots of minerals - the objects that sit within the goods we use to create our virtual world. The work is inspired by the hardware used by artist programmers in the 1960s, yet the aesthetics are inspired from a variety of photographers. The work aims to "present the un-presentable", a quote from Jean Francis Lyotard that sat with me throughout the creation of this series. 



My final series is often confused as being real landscapes to the untrained eye. Our faith in the photograph lies not only from its “physically descriptive level”, but also in a broader sense because it “confirms our sense of omnipresence as well as the validity of the material world” (Ritchin in Philip Brey, 1999: 23). My work provides evidence that shaking that faith can often be challenging.


The title of this body of work relates to how mountains are formed. Convergent boundaries happen when two plates collide –they push against each other, and the only way that the earth’s crust can deal with this is by pushing up. Many minerals are also created from the heat during this process. Landscapes Without Memory, Memory without Land directly addresses the creation of these landscapes - they do not exist, and never will.


Thank you to Bristol Museum and Camborne School of Mines who allowed me to photograph these minerals.

info
info
info
info
info
info
info
info
info
Using Format